Water

Water: Two Views of a Vital Resource

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Water: Two Views of a Vital Resource

(1) Water Shortage:  Crisis or Opportunity Olivier Jerphagnon of PowWow Energy

(2) Water: The Lifeblood of Silicon Valley Jim Fiedler of Santa Clara Valley Water District

~ Time to Register! ~

Olivier JerphagnonOlivier Jerphagnon of PowWow Energy and winner of the 2013 Cleantech Open will talk about how PowWow Energy's technology and data analysis give farmers significant savings in both water and energy use.  Olivier will also talk about his lessons learned as an entrepreneur, including how they got started and what they learned while going through the Cleantech Open program, leading up to the national competition.

Olivier Jerphagnon is co-founder and CEO of PowWow Energy, a SaaS company addressing the growing energy-water crisis in the Agriculture sector.  Previously Olivier was CEO of Monitoring Division Inc., a provider of data sensing and machine learning technology professional services to tier-1 carriers. Olivier also was part of the original team at Calient and rose to European Managing Director. He has a Diplôme d’Ingénieur from INP Grenoble, France and an MS from UC Santa Barbara.

 

Jim Fiedler picJim Fiedler, Chief Operating Officer for the Santa Clara Valley Water, is responsible for leading Santa Clara’s water supply program consisting of: water importation, surface reservoir operations and storage, groundwater management, raw and treated water delivery, drinking water treatment, water recycling and water conservation programs. Jim is Chair of the San Francisco Estuary Institute (SFEI) Board of Directors; and serves on the Board of the WateReuse Association and holds other industry leadership roles. Jim has a BS from Loyola Marymount and an MS from Stanford in Civil Engineering.

The Santa Clara Valley Water District (SCVWD), formed in 1929 following a multiyear drought, has built a comprehensive water management system that has supported the transformation from the agricultural “Valley of Heart’s Delight” to the technological “Silicon Valley.”  Come learn where your water comes from, how it is stored and managed.  How will the current drought affect Silicon Valley?  What challenges does the SCVWD face and how does it work with other agencies?  What innovations are allowing water re-use?

 

Thursday Evening, February 6, 2014
6:30 pm - 7:00 pm Check-in, Networking & Light Refreshments
7:00 pm - 8:30 pm Presentation and Q&A (No Morning EGG Meeting)

SEMI Building “Main Entrance” (for questions email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.) 3081 Zanker Road, San Jose, CA 95134

ADVANCE TICKETS $6.50 Otherwise $10 AT THE DOOR
http://svctss20140206.eventbrite.com/

*SEATING IS LIMITED - RESERVE YOUR SPOT TODAY!*

Rain Water Harvesting, RWH

A Presentation by Brad Daniel of Rainsavers

rainsavers logoRain is pure. Your tap is not. Rain doesn't contain salts, iron, fluoride or chlorine. RWH decreases erosion, run off, flooding, energy use and pollution into the Bay. The State of California uses 20% of its electricity transporting water. RWH uses water at the point of collection. Learn how to be more resilient when facing dry or drought years.

 

 

 

Read more: Rain Water Harvesting, RWH

Water Efficient Home As A Model For Building Standards

An Article Authored by  Brad Daniel

Rainsavers recently completed a job in Mountain View, California whose owner built a home that uses very little municipal water and has native Santa Clara County plants, grasses and fruit trees. Rainsavers installs rain barrels, tanks and complete systems for residential, commercial and public facilities.

house1 BDThe homeowner built the home with a grey water recycling system, sheet metal roofing material, a solar hot water heating system, a “wetland” leach field where the grey water is diverted and a Rain Water harvesting system.

The owner also had a nine thousand gallon underground cistern installed as the home was built to store the rainwater from the roof. One of the goals and mandates coming from state and local governments is to greatly reduce runoff from around the bay area. All the gutter downspouts are routed to the tank. The water collected is tied to her drip irrigation system and used on the landscape. The tank overflow is directed to a rain garden where the water seeps back into the ground.

Rainsavers was hired to install the pump, pressure tank, electronic valves, controller, PVC conduits and electrical supply for the system on her property.

The first picture shows the smooth concrete siding, the metal roof, manhole access to the tank and the wetland field on the left side. 

house2 BDThe drip system can be automatically switched from municipal water to the rain water system depending on storage levels, via a three-way electronic control valve.

The second picture shows the pump, pressure tank, controller and electric panel. A pressure tank has 20-40 pounds of air pressure to prevent the pump from cycling on/off as the systems is used. The controller monitors the water level in the tank, and it can activate system flush, backup, transfers, drain and service reminders.  

 

 

house3 BDYou can view the home at the owners online blog www.301monroe.com.


Rainsavers can be contacted at www.rainsaversonline.com.

 

 

 

 

Rainwater Storage Systems Save Energy and the Environment

rain barrel green 1Homeowners are seeking independence from rising water costs & shortages install rainwater storage systems. rainsavers logo

Brad Daniel of RainSavers Inc. was quoted in Eucalyptus magazine, “The state of California spends 20 percent of its energy budget on collecting, treating and transporting water. Our reliance on the delivery of water to our taps may have to change in the next decade. Most people don’t know this, but Nov. 12, 2009, California mandated a 20 percent reduction in water deliveries by 2020 (2020/20 Water Conservation Mandate). In 10 years, water deliveries will be 20 percent less, yet our population is expected to grow, not shrink.”

“Capturing water at the source will help reduce energy usage, saving money and the environment. Rainwater catchment reduces the runoff from our homes to the bay, which slows pollution of the bay. It preserves water at the place where it falls, allowing it to percolate into the soil and replenish the aquifer. People who have rainwater catchment systems enjoy the security of knowing that they have extra water stored up for an emergency, for irrigation, for car washing, and more.”

 

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